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  Police Blotter 

Saturday, July 12, 2019

Pedophile Arrested

Robert Calvert faces charges.

 

Saturday, July 12, 2019

Bank Robber Sought

Abby suspect identified.

 

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Nothing Too Big For Thief

Abby cop find semis, drugs.

 

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Car Thieves Start Fires

Attempt to get cat converters.

 

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Teen Caught Doing 187 km/h

Cops throw the book at him.

 

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Woman Found Dead in House

Surrey RCMP investigating.

Sat Sept 13

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Vancouver

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Breaking Crime News:    •     Abby Bank Robber Sought      •     Pedophile rrested in Chilliwack     •     Surrey Thieif Busted With Cars, Tractor-trailers, Semi, Excavators on Property      •    Two Miscreants Start Car Fires trying to Steal Catralytic Converters in North Van    •     An 18-year-old Caught Doing 180 km/h in Audi     •     Woman Found Dead Under Suspcious Circumstances  

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 Tuesday July 16, 2019 

Published 8 am

 

Chilliwack Shriners step up to the plate for Children's Hospital

Fundraising totals over $75,000

Jeremy Colwell, Gizeh Shriners of BC and Yukon

Darwin Marsh, Secretary of the Shriners of BC & Yukon Child Services Society,  presented a major donation of $74,633.30 (l to r)  Jerry Gantt, Lew V. Rossner and Jim Cain.

 

uring the Imperial Session (annual general meeting) of Shriners International just held in Nashville, TN, Lew V Rossner, President and Darwin Marsh, Secretary of the Shriners of BC & Yukon Child Services Society presented a major donation of $74,633.30 to Shriners International Divan Potentate, Imperial Sir Jim Cain and Shriners Hospitals for Children Chairman, Imperial Sir Jerry G. Gantt, for the care of children at Shriners Hospitals for Children – Canada located in Montreal.  

These funds originated through the efforts of one of Gizeh’s Shrine Clubs – the Fraser Valley Shrine Club No. 11, which has been active as a Gizeh Shrine Club since 1951 in Chilliwack, BC.

"Thank you to the Shriners of BC & Yukon Child Services Society, your commitment to giving access care of children in your communities is to be commended," shares David Merrett, Chairman of the Board of Shriners Hospitals for Children - Canada. "We are extremely grateful to all the Shriners who have raised funds to support care and services at Shriners Hospitals for Children – Canada."

“We are very proud to support patient care at Shriners Hospitals for Children – Canada. We know that these funds will make a difference in the care and the lives of children from across Canada, from BC to Newfoundland, through specialized care for complex and chronic orthopaedic conditions”, comments Rick Hunter, President of the Fraser Valley Shrine Club No. 11. 

The Shriners fraternity support their philanthropy, the network of Shriners Hospitals for Children, through a variety of fundraising activities, donations and the proceeds of wills and bequests.

For children in BC and Yukon requiring medical attention for any of the orthopaedic and other pediatric specialty conditions we treat, local Shriners will support transportation and accommodation associated with medical treatment and follow-up care provided at Shriners Hospitals for Children. Depending on a child’s diagnosis, care could be directed through Shriners of British Columbia & Yukon Child Services Society to any one of the Shriners Children’s Hospitals; however, the majority of children in BC and Yukon referred to us are treated at Shriners Hospitals in Portland or Spokane and Montreal.

A physician’s referral is not necessary; however each case is reviewed by a Shriners hospital doctor to determine the best course of treatment. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

“As Shriners, there is no better recognition than seeing a child’s condition improve and witnessing the parents relief and renewed hope. Annually we help more than 184 families from BC and Yukon to find the second opinion or care they need.  We can do so thanks to the tremendous fundraising efforts of Shriners and the support of local communities across BC and Yukon,” concludes Lew V Rossner, President of the Shriners of BC & Yukon Child Services Society.

For more information about Gizeh Shriners of BC & Yukon and the Shriners of BC and Yukon Child Services Society, activities and fundraising events as well as patient referral, visit www.bcshriners.com.

 

 

 Tuesday July 16, 2019 

Published 8 am

 

Lookin' for some good cookin'

5th Annual Barn Burner BBQ Full Cupboard fundraiser July 21

Johanne Rene, FVSP

 

Local event featuring family fun, music and cash prizes for best chefs

 

ark your calendars for the 5th Annual Barn Burner BBQ (#BBBBQ). Chilliwack’s tastiest community event is presented by Johnston's Pork and Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry.

When: Sunday, July 21, 10am-4:30pm

Where: Farm Store in Yarrow - 4540 Simmons Rd.

This family-friendly BBQ extravaganza is officially sanctioned by the Kansas City BBQ Society. Entry to the event is by donation, with 100% of the proceeds going to the Full Cupboard, a program designed to raise food, funds, and awareness for food banks in Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Langley, Surrey and surrounding communities.

Recommended donation is $5 per person. BBBBQ 2018 raised $9,543, for a total exceeding $19,000 in 3 years. Help us reach our of $15,000 on July 21st!

The winning team with the highest total points in all four categories (Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Chicken, Ribs) will take home their share of $5,000 in prize money, along with the Barn Burner BBQ Grand Championship trophy, bragging rights, and a spot in the Jack Daniel's World Championship Invitational BBQ in Tennessee.

Teams also compete in a "Black Box" cook-off. This "Iron Chef" style competition presents cooks with a black box containing four mystery ingredients. All ingredients must be incorporated into a single dish and submitted to the judges, who will award points based on originality, taste and presentation.

Comedian Cliff Prang makes his debut as emcee for the event, while meat lovers of all ages are invited to join the festivities including a live performances by Ryan McAllister, The K-O’s, and the Tanner Olsen Band. The event will feature activities for the entire family including a climbing wall, mechanical bull, dunk tank, face-painting, animal balloons, and more! Samples are limited but you will have a variety of food trucks to choose from along with thirst quenching beverages from Old Yale Brewing and Fraser Valley Cider.

Schedule:
• 10:00 am: Event Opens with Phil Prang and Ryan McAllister takes the stage
• 11:00 am: Chicken competition judging (cooked for approximately 4 hours)
• 12:00 pm: Ribs competition judging (cooked for approximately 6 hours), The K-Os take the stage
• 1:00 pm: Pork competition judging (cooked for approximately 12 hours)
• 2:00 pm: Brisket competition (cooked for approximately 12-16 hours), The Tanner Olsen Band takes the stage
• 3:00 pm: Black Box competition
• 4:30 pm: Awards ceremony & Grand Championship winner announced

BBQ is NOT grilling:

There is a very distinct difference between grilling and BBQ. Southern style BBQ is a technique in which meat is cooked at low temperatures (about 225 F) for a long time over indirect heat. The heat source is charcoal and wood. No gas/propane is allowed. The Barn Burner BBQ competition consists of four main categories: Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Chicken and Ribs. Brisket is cooked for up to 16 hours. Ribs take approximately 6 hours and chicken take as long as 4 hours.

Visit barnburnerbbq.ca for more details. Connect on Facebook: Barn Burner BBQ and Instagram: Barnburnerbbq

 

 

 

 Friday July 12, 2019 

Published 8 am

 

Planet stewards

Road to sustainable cities laid out from peak to valley

Myrtle Mcdonald, B.Sc (U of Alberta) M.Sc.A. (McGill University) Author/Voice file photo

 

Painting by Dianne Mackenzie

For the following reasons I do not mind having taxes increased, which will soon pay for themselves:

 

ore money needs to go into education. Student loans are so high that few enter medical, physiotherapy and anesthesia professions. There are far from enough. There are long waits for surgery and poor rehabilitation both post-op and in the community. See more here.
 

 

 Friday July 12, 2019 

Published 8 am

 

New way to cast a ballot

Elections BC is looking for legislation to bring in e-voting machines

Elections BC/Wikicommons image

 

 

 

t's a long way off, but Elections BC is hoping to modernize its voting system prior to the next provincial general election on October 16, 2021 by updating how votes will be cast, including the use of "electronic poll-books for real-time strike-off and ballot tabulators for efficient and faster counting."

 

"Elections BC is pleased that the Attorney General's office is moving forward with some of our recommendations for legislative change to improve elections in BC," said Anton Boegman, British Columbia's Chief Electoral Officer. "Should voting modernization be adopted, it will improve the voting experience for British Columbians, make voting faster, improve accessibility, speed up results, and provide candidates with current participation information to assist them in their efforts to get out the vote."

 

 

 

 Thursday, July 11, 2019 

Published 1 pm

 

Bringing out the best in the community

Rotary Club, Interact Club name board members

Rotary Club, Chilliwack, BC/Handout photos

 

Popular local business man Michael Berger (front) receives Order of Chilliwack from Doug Wickers.

 

otarians and dignitaries gathered on July 5 for the installation of the 2019-20 boards of the Rotary Club of Chilliwack and the Interact Club of Chilliwack.

 

This year’s Chilliwack Rotary executive members are:

Michael Berger                                   President

Shelley MacDonell                     President Elect

Doug Wickers                              Past President

Julie Unger                                          Secretary

Bob Ramsbottom                                 Treasurer

Ross Hall                              Executive Secretary

Read more here.

 

 

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 6 pm

 

Drone Alone

Charger starts fire, crews find home filled with black smoke, Chief offers tips

Mike Bourdon, Assistant Chief, Fire Prevention

Chilliwack Fire Department/Google Satellite image

 

 

Campbell Rd.

n Wednesday, at approximately 3:45 pm, the Chilliwack Fire Department was dispatched to a reported structure fire located in the 49000-block of Campbell Rd.

 

The occupant of the home had put his drone battery on its charger to charge. The occupants had left the home and approximately 1 hour later the owner of the home arrived back and upon entry, heard the smoke alarm and notice the home was full of black smoke. The home owner immediately exited the residence and called 911.

 

Firefighters responded from Halls 1, 2, 4, 5 & 6 and on arrival, reported seeing light smoke within a single-storey residential home.

 

When the crews entered, they noticed the home was fully charged with smoke. Upon entering one of the bedrooms they saw a small flame on top of a desk where the battery charger was kept. Interior fire crew quickly extinguished the fire and proceeded with overhaul and salvage operations. The home sustained smoke damage and minor fire damage to contents within the bedroom.

 

There were no civilian and or firefighter injuries.

 

The lithium polymer drone battery that had been on the charger was likely the cause of the fire. 

Chilliwack Fire Department recommends only use the battery that is designed for the device and when charging a lithium battery, always follow the manufacturer safety instructions that come with the device. Never leave the area unattended when charging in case the battery overheats and always charge the battery on a non-combustible surface and away from combustibles.

 

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 6 pm

 

Cougar Alert!

FVRD says sightings taking place on Promontory, tips if confronted

Erin Patrick, BSc., Dipl. T., WildSafeBC Community Coordinator, FVRD/Wiki image

here have been several reports of a cougar in the Promontory area of Chilliwack. The Conservation Officer Service is monitoring the situation. Please continue to report cougar sightings to the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277. Pets should be kept indoors and children should be monitored while playing outside. Avoid walking alone at dusk and dawn when cougars are most active. While cougar attacks are rare, pets and small children are most at risk. Cougar attacks often involve young cougars learning to hunt or older cougars that are less efficient at catching their primary prey.

Cougars are elusive and wide ranging animals. To reduce conflict where you live it is important to mitigate risks by reducing attractants that may encourage them to stay:

• Keep pets indoors, especially at night. Free-ranging cats and dogs may be at risk
• Feed pets indoors
• Take down bird feeders. Fallen seeds from bird feeders may attract rodents and other mammals, and subsequently attract cougars
• Use properly installed and maintained electric fencing to protect chickens, small livestock or other attractants
• Store all animal feed securely and keep feeding areas clean
• Never feed deer or other wildlife that may be potential prey for cougars
 

If you encounter a cougar, stay calm. Make yourself appear as large as possible and back away slowly. Never run and do not turn your back on the cougar. If you have small children or pets with you, pick them up immediately. If the cougar approaches stand your ground, maintain eye contact and speak using a loud, firm voice. Reinforce the fact that you are a human and not an easy target. Back out of the area and seek help or shelter. If the cougar approaches, stop and respond aggressively. In the event of an attack, fight back, focusing on the facial area and eyes.

For more information on cougar safety and reducing conflicts, refer to the WildSafeBC website. Bear spray can also be used as a deterrent and information on the safe use and transport can be found here.

 

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 6 pm

 

Crash test dummies

Dangerous feed additive and faked health certificates doesn't faze Health Canada

Betty Krawchuk/Website image

 

hina has halted all beef and pork exports from Canada. The reason? A feed restrictive additive called ractopamine. Traces of it were found in a batch of pork products by Chinese inspectors. This additive is banned in Russia, Europe and China, but of course approved in the U.S. and Canada. Why do I say “of course”?

 

Because we know that the US is not averse to experimenting on its own populations with dangerous drugs and Canada more likely than not to follow the lead of the US. Read more here.

 

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 6 pm

 

One Night Stand

3rd Annual Nick Taylor "An Evening Under the Stars" fundraiser Sept 4

Shirley Trimestra, CCS/CCS images

 

 

Restaurant 62, Cliff Prang, March Hare will be part of the entertainment

 

n Wednesday, September 4, enjoy the stars, food, drink, music, fun, and friendship at the Third Annual Nick Taylor Charity Gala in support of Chilliwack Community Services and 27 Blue. See more here.

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 6 pm

 

Parliamentarians' wake-up call

Six ways to revise the Constitution and save Canada

John Labelle, Veterans Super Annuity/File photo

 

 

Members of Parliament can purchase their own retirement plan, just as all Canadians do.

 

peaking on amendments to the Constitution. "I could end the deficit in 5 minutes," he told CNBC. "You just pass a law that says that anytime there is a deficit of more than 3% of GDP, all sitting members of Congress are ineligible for re-election. The 26th amendment (granting the right to vote for 18 year-olds) took only 3 months & 8 days to be ratified! Why? Simple! The people demanded it. Read more here.

 

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 6 pm

 

Beyond creativity

BC Culture Days Sept 27-29

Sarah Gosh, MPMG/Submitted photos

 

Tiffany Blaise will be one of the many artists displaying talent.

 

C Culture Days is pleased to announce its 2019 ambassadors. In honour of Culture Days' 10th anniversary celebration, 10 ambassadors will each be awarded $1,000, work with professional mentors, present a free Culture Days activity, and act as a spokesperson for BC Culture Days leading up to the Culture Days weekend on September 27–29, 2019.  Read more here.

 

 

 Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Published 8 am

 

Metal Heads

Copper, gold, silver and brass on the minds of local treasure hunters

Staff/Submitted photos

 

Michael Hadac (r to l), Fred Dyon and Marny McEwan Zischka.

 

hey're metal detecting enthusiasts. They come from all walks with the draw of the thrill of finding something of value, an old coin or sometimes it's expensive jewellry, a piece of history, or just an item interest to talk about. That's what drives members of The Fraser Valley Treasure Hunters (FVTH).

The group's focus is to make the hobby more enjoyable by having organised hunts and sharing experiences with other members.

They go out on group hunts and solo adventures throughout the month then meet to share their finds over dinners at the Abbotsford Legion.


Mark Lewis, (l to r) Kris Szigeti and Paul Husak.


The are times when FVTH founder Mark Lewis and the group are called upon to do a special search for lost necklaces, lost weddings rings or other keepsakes.

May Hunter of the month

1st Place Michael Hadac Indian Heart Cent

2nd Place Fred Dyon Silver Necklace and Pendant

3rd Place Marny McEwan Zischka Girlguide Lapel Pin

 

June Hunter of the Month

1st Place Kris Szigeti Childs Sterling Silver Ring

2nd Place Mark Lewis 14Kt Plated Ring

3rd Place Paul Husak Silver Canadian 10 Cent

 

Treasured People

Finding the Past

Finders Keepers
Close Encounters of the Treasure Kind

Website
Video

 

New members are always welcome. Connnect on Facebook here.  E-mail Mark here.
 

 

 Saturday, July 6, 2019 

Published 8 am

 

Melodious Men

Harrison Music Festival July 12-21

BRYAN CUTLER/Website photo

 

Heavyweight Brass Band play Harrison Music Festival

 

he Harrison Festival of the Arts is known around the world for its creative and diverse programming. This multidisciplinary event presents a variety of art forms, from film to theatre and visual art, but the bulk of the programming is roots music from around the globe. Artistic Director Andy Hillhouse has put together a program that contrasts boundary pushing artists from a variety of global cultures with music of celebration and the party spirit. See more here.

 

 

 Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Published 8 am

 

Carbon tax rebates upped

Families, singles will see increases on July cheques

BC Gov't Caucus/Website image

 

Carbon Tax refunds coming in July.

 

early fifty per cent of B.C. families will receive more for their climate action tax credit this week, putting money back in their pockets and helping make life more affordable.

On Friday, July 5, 2019, eligible families will see the first of four installments of the newly expanded credit. Families of four will receive up to $400 over the next year, and up to $500 starting in July 2021 when the credit will be nearly 70% higher than it was in 2017.

The climate action tax credit offsets B.C.’s carbon tax and helps low- and middle-income families as the Province transitions to a cleaner, greener economy. This is the second increase to the climate action tax credit since it was last expanded in September 2017.

Expanding the credit is an important part of government’s commitment to make life more affordable for everyone in B.C., while continuing to meet climate change goals under the Province’s CleanBC plan to reduce carbon pollution, drive sustainable growth and protect B.C.’s clean air, land and water.

Budget 2019 invested $223 million to increase the climate action tax credit over three years:

• Effective July 2019, the maximum annual climate action tax credit will be increased to $154.50 per adult and to $45.50 per child.
• Effective July 2021, the maximum annual climate action tax credit will be increased to $193.50 per adult and to $56.50 per child.
• Single-parent families will continue to receive the adult amount for the first child in the family.

See more about the tax and if you're eligible here.

 

 

 Monday, July 1, 2019

Published 8 am

 

Rivers connect people

The poetry of simple walks along rivers

Chris Hunt, Trout Unlimited Org/Voice file photos

 

The Fraser River high during melt water season..

 

’m in Little Rock, Ark., this week for the Outdoor Writers Association of America conference. Our hotel is situated right on the banks of what looks to be an angry Arkansas River.

Years ago, I worked as an editor and reporter for a couple of small newspapers about 1,000 miles away, near the headwaters of the this great American river. The little town of Buena Vista (pronounced Byoona Vista if you live there) is but 50 miles or so from the actual start of the Arkansas as it tumbles off of Fremont Pass in cental Colorado and flows south near the town of Leadville, through Buena Vista and the new Browns Canyon National Monument. It then winds through Salida and eventually the Royal Gorge and Pueblo, picking up small tributaries along most of its upper course. After leaving Pueblo Reservoir, the Arkansas meanders across the prairies until, here in the state of Arkansas, it becomes a big, muddy southern river.

This last winter was a record-setter for the folks back in Colorado, and they can lay claim to the fact that they’re sending quite a bit of the water that is swelling the river’s banks here in Little Rock so far downstream. It’s been a great year for snow melt, and I suspect it’s going to be a pretty lively rafting and kayak season on the river near its genesis.

 No he's not digging a fishing hole he's sluicing for gold.

The Arkansas in Colorado is a playground for boaters and, at certain times of the year, it’s a great river for wild brown trout. It is, after all, home to the famous Mother’s Day caddis hatch.

But I’ve always looked at the Arkansas as a river with challenges. Within sight of where it begins as spring water and melting snow, the old Climax molybdenum mine has literally shaved off the peaks of the Mosquito Range above the river. Hundreds–maybe even thousands–of small mines, mostly abandoned and shuttered now, dot the mountainsides around the river’s upper reaches, as well as along its tributary streams that start high in the Sawatch and Collegiate ranges and drain some truly wild, high-elevation country.

Those old mines, to this day, drain heavy metals into the Arkansas, and they very likely will for years to come. There are efforts to curb their impact–and better fishing in the river’s lower reaches testify to those efforts being at least somewhat successful–but the river will, for the foreseeable future, always be a conduit for abandoned mine runoff.

Nevertheless, it’s a beloved resource in Colorado. Saturday night, those of us attending the conference here in Little Rock got to listen to music and dine on some spectacular southern-fried catfish as the river–brown and roiling from a seriously wet spring and, of course, from Colorado’s immense snow melt this year–flowed by within just a few feet.

As much as Coloradans love the Arkansas, I would venture to say that Arkansans are pretty fond of it, too. Bridges over the big river draw tourists seeking selfies with the city skyline in the background, and walking paths and greenbelts abound. It’s not just a feature here in Little Rock. It’s the feature.

Fly fishing on the Vedder River.

At TU, we do work on a lot of rivers–some just near the source, where the cold water flows and where the trout swim. But our work in the little tributaries and trickles that come together to make mighty rivers impacts those big waters, often many miles away from where we clean up abandoned mines or restore streams to their natural course and help make fishing better.

All across the country, there examples where small projects in headwater streams contribute to quality water downstream, where these rivers provide for everything from industrial use to drinking water to shipping. The Arkansas is no different.

Just a few years ago, TU worked to protect Browns Canyon as a national monument–local stakeholders who understand the value of protecting wild landscapes and intact, healthy watersheds came together and convinced then-President Obama to create the monument that today defines the canyon country of central Colorado.

A pair of fishers out on a Fraser River bar.

And that, of courses, protects the quality of the water as the river flows 1,000 miles away in downtown Little Rock, where families gathered over the weekend to listen to music under sultry southern skies and enjoy the river as it wanders on by en route to the Mississippi.

Rivers don’t just connect places. They don’t just provided a path for water from the highest mountains to the lush southern woods.

Rivers connect people, too. And that’s a lesson we just can’t learn enough.

Visit Trout Unlimited for Voices from River featuring the best writers across the country of all kinds of fishing held from salmon to sturgeon to of course trout and help support one of the best fisher websites in the US and Canadians. The advice, tips and stores is for everyone, Canadians too, so you can donate or join the membership and signup for their newsletter.

 

 

 

 Monday, July 1, 2019

Published 8 am

 

Community breakfasts are best

Chilliwack fire department rolls out the grills to feed a hungry Chilliwack

Staff/Voice photo

 

 

Youth chow down on the best pancakes in the city.

 

t was festive feeling Saturday as residents rubbed elbows with each other for the annual Chilliwack Fire Department's pancake breakfast in support of the Burn Fund.

At first glance it looked like it was the most well-attended breakfast over the past several years, if not ever. They even had to run for more supplies. 

Firefighters do more in the community than just fight fires. A couple of times a year they hoof it through neighbourhoods looking for donations to the food bank.

The Chilliwack Firefighters Charitable Society was originally formed in order to enable us to give back our community.

"Our mandate allows us to give monies to other registered charities, such as the BC Professional Firefighters Burn Fund, BC Cancer Society, Chilliwack Hospice Society, Big Brothers and Big Sisters of the Fraser Valley, Chilliwack Children's Foundation, and Chilliwack Community Services."

In addition, CFD has scholarship bursary  awarded each year to a Chilliwack student.

 

 

 

 Monday, July 1, 2019  

Published 8 am

 

Late night vehicle fires

Three cars burn in house driveway

Staff/Voice photo

 

 

A visitor to an Air BnB on Rotary Ave paces outside the fire scene.

 

vehicle fire in the driveway of an Air BnB house driveway on Rotary Ave. overnight Saturday intensified forcing firefighters to deal with it as it spread to two other vehicles.

An explosion could be heard assumedly from a gas tank igniting.

The fire was contained to the vehicles and the house later ventilated. Residents evacuated safely and there were no injuries to firefighters.

It's not known if the fire was accidental or arson.

 

 Friday, June 28, 2019  

Published 8 am

 

High wire music act

Juno award-nominated Aerialists play Harrison July 19

Mavis Harris, Marmot PR/Pat Valade 2018  photo

 

A fully loaded truck was located empty.

 

ominated for a 2019 Juno Award as well as a Canadian Folk Music Award for "Emerging Artist of the Year," Aerialists meld their ferociously creative harmonic sensibilities and deep love for folk traditions into a post-rock coloured sound called prog-trad. Featuring Scottish harpist Màiri Chaimbeul (Darol Anger), and Canadian neo-folk innovators Adam Iredale-Gray (Fish & Bird) on guitar and Elise Boeur (Jenny Ritter) on fiddle with a stellar rhythm section, the group draws from the wells of Nordic and Gaelic music, adding expansive textures and meticulously sculpted arrangements to create captivating, genre-defying new music.


Following the release of their new album Group Manoeuvre in 2018, the band toured in the UK with high-profile shows at Celtic Connections in Glasgow, performed at Belgium's renowned Muzieklub 't Ey, and toured in Canada including performances at Vancouver Jazz Festival, Hillside Festival, Deep Roots Festival, Northern Lights Festival Boréal, and Islands Folk Festival. Aerialists are returning to the studio in January, and currently booking for 2019 in the UK, western Europe, Canada, and the northeastern USA.

 

 

 Thursday, June 27, 2019  

Published 8 pm

 

Stolen U-Haul leaves couple with nothing

Police look to the community for help

Sgt. Judy Bird/Submitted photos

 

 

A fully loaded truck was located empty.

 

he Abbotsford Police are asking for the public’s assistance in helping to locate items stolen from a couple who were about to embark on a cross-Canada move to Manitoba.

Between Friday June 21 and Saturday June 22, a moving truck that was to haul the couple’s belongings from Abbotsford to Winnipeg, Manitoba was stolen from a hotel parking lot on Mt Lehman Road.


Some of the stolen items.


"The moving truck, a U-Haul bearing Arizona license plate AJ32495, contained most of the couple’s belongings, including furniture, burl coffee table, books, photos and a scooter. The moving truck was recovered on Saturday morning (June 22) in the Fraser Heights Secondary School parking lot in Surrey, but it was completely empty," said Sgt. Judy Bird, Abbotsford PD.

Photos of stolen items include a bookcase and a red Taotao scooter.

If you have any information or dashcam footage that may assist in this investigation, please contact the Abbotsford Police at 604-859-5225, text 222973 (abbypd) or call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

 

 

 

 Thursday, June 27, 2019  

Published 8 pm

 

Silk hat on a sow's ear

Chilliwack's hospital is 108-years-old, it's time for a new one

Staff/Voice file photo

 

MLA John Martin speaks at one of the election debates.

 

 hundred and eight years ago Chilliwack General Hospital (CGH) was a wonderful medical centre. But like an old car that you need to keep fixing there comes a time when you have to buy a new vehicle. Now, a century later, there's just too many things wrong with CGH to keep stitching it together. Many also feel that it's a health liability with over a century of germs embedded into its walls.

 

Yesterday, the provincial government sent out a dispatch where MLA John Martin poked his finger at FHA over the hospital maternity ward problem is no help. As a politician you don't work that way. You don't sit back and take pot shots. You get the mayors together, go in and demand meetings and get into some hard discussions about building a new hospital. Difficult but doable. But Martin wants the easy way out and shuck the blame.

 

MLA Laurie Throness likened the $10 million upgrade with St Paul's $500 million. But what he failed to say was that St. Paul's is a whole new hospital.

It might be that residents would help and pay $10 or $20 if it means being able to have a new hospital with an MRI. But you can't install a new MRI into an old hospital like CGH without adding a new wing. So if you're going to add a new wing, then why not a new hospital?

 

They have to plan moving forward for an expanding population and get the location now. If Vancouver Coastal Health can do it with their limited space and St Paul's Hospital then there's nothing to stop Chilliwack from doing the same thing. A hospital that's a hundred-years-old should be roped off as a health hazard.

 

The suggested $10 million dollars to refit the maternity ward should be used to retain obstetricians and go toward a new hospital.

 

If highly-paid City planners David Blaine and Peter Montief can secure the location now then they'll be earning their keep. If all the local municipalities are going to benefit then they all have to be on board. But Martin is breaking down any positive action with his finger-pointing and Throness seems to be bad at math with his skewed numbers. The community is fraught with anxiety. What the city doesn't need is bickering over non-partisan issues.

 

 

 Thursday, June 27, 2019  

Published 8 pm

 

Small accident big backup

The new law is difficult to work with

Staff/Voice file photo

 

Traffic wasn't moving after an accident on Yale Rd. last Friday.

 

raffic was snarled after a fender-bender on Yale Rd last Friday. Thankfully no one was seriously injured in the accident.

 

A new law that's been on the books since March 8th requires police to attend accidents of over $10,000 damage regardless of the type of vehicle. Previously the threshold where an officer attended was $1000. Now it's $600 for motorcycles and $100 for bicycles now.

 

So if no one is hurt then tow trucks are called and traffic is cleared up sooner.

 

“Police officers will continue to attend collisions involving minor property damage at their discretion – for example, if questions arise about driver impairment or who’s at fault,” said Chief Const. Neil Dubord, chair of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police traffic safety committee. “However, lifting the threshold for mandatory, written reports when officers do attend will help clear crash scenes much more quickly. In turn, it may lower risks for those working at the scene and motorists alike.”

 

 

 Thursday, June 27, 2019  

Published 8 pm

 

Truck and a trip

The best part of losing is reading about the winner

Lotto BC/Handout photo

 

Fraser Aird couldn't wait to tell hihs family he won half a million dollars.

 

ldergrove’s Fraser Aird admits he had trouble keeping steady after discovering he was holding a Lotto Max ticket worth $500,000.

The 55-year-old matched all four Extra numbers in the Lotto Max draw held on Friday, June 21, 2019 to win the half-million dollar prize.

“I tried to pour myself a coffee, but I was shaking so much I could barely pour it,” exclaimed Aird, who was at the 7-Eleven on Fraser Highway in Aldergrove when he discovered he had won. “I was most excited to share the news with my wife and son. They couldn’t believe it!”

Aird was born in Ontario but has called Aldergrove home for the past 30 years. He says the win provides financial security for the family, but adds he plans to buy a new truck, take family and friends out for a nice dinner and head back East to visit his mom.

 

Lotto Max can be purchased at all lottery retail locations and online at PlayNow.com, with tickets available until 7:30 p.m. (PDT) on Tuesdays and Fridays.

 

 

 

© 2008-2018 The Valley Voice News | All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

July 16, 2019

Today is the 196th day

There are 159 days left in 2019

1935 The world's first parking meter, known as Park -O-Meter No. 1, is installed on the southeast corner of what was then First Street and Robinson Avenue in Oklahoma City.
 
1941 Joe DiMaggio hits safely for the 56th consecutive game, a streak that still stands as a MLB record.
 
1945 At 5:29:45 a.m., the Manhattan Project comes to an explosive end as the first atom bomb is successfully tested in Alamogordo, New Mexico.
 
1948 The storming of the cockpit of the Miss Macao passenger seaplane, operated by a subsidiary of the Cathay Pacific Airways, marks the first aircraft hijacking of a commercial plane.
 
1956 Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus closes its very last "Big Tent" show in Pittsburgh due to changing economics all subsequent circus shows will be held in arenas.
 
1981 Singer-songwriter Harry Chapin, died at aged 38 suffering a cardiac arrest while driving on a New York expressway. His car was hit from behind by a tractor-trailer, causing the gas tank to explode.
 
1990 The Luzon Earthquake strikes in Benguet, Pangasinan, Nueva Ecija, La Union, Aurora, Bataan, Zambales and Tarlac, Philippines, with an intensity of 7.7.
 
1994 Comet Shoemaker –Levy 9 collides with Jupiter. Impacts continue until July 22.
 
1995 Rap singer Queen Latifah was the victim of a car-jacking attempt that went wrong, leaving her bodyguard shot and wounded.
 
1999 John F. Kennedy, Jr.; his wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy; and her sister, Lauren Bessette, die when their single-engine plane crashes into the Atlantic Ocean near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.
 
2010 U.S.-born Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki is placed on the U.S. 'terror blacklist'

May-Sept

Vancouver

Veterans - RCMP

Wed July 31

Vancouver

 

Community Friends

The Voice is always there for the community when they need it.

 

Compassionate Neighbourhood

Health Partners 

Society

 

 

 

 

 

Drop in and have a coffee and gab with the gang at this fun coffee get together. Visit their website for dates and times.

 

 

My IT guy, Experience Computers is the best.  Straight up. You don't need anyone else. The store is behind 7-11 on Yale.

Mark at Midnite Auto is the best and where The Voice vehicles. He goes above and beyond and has the largest mustang parts collection and front ends in BC. His customers  come from all parts of the Lower Mainland and beyond.

You can't get better service than at the Firestone shop on Yale Rd. They're always friendly and happy to help. Love these guys.

If you're looking for the best record players in the world and a huge record collection, you'll find them at Classic Sound on Wellington Ave.

The Tireland guys on Yale Rd. are great and very helpful. Love these guys. Ever need air? Drive in, they'll check your tire pressure and all you have to say is "thanks"

The unsung heroes in the community are the St John's volunteers. We sure need 'em and they're there.

Dave's a great guy and his staff are top notch. The oil changes are perfect. They'll even put the oil in for you if you bring it and do your windows too!

Where would we be with them. Not only do they help needy people in the community, but they run out to big fires and feed the fire department. Food Banks are a cheap form of public insurance in case of disaster.

www.chilliwackvchurch.ca

No perfect People

Real friendly pastor, small but awesome congregation, super venue and lots of parking on College St.

A great bunch and much appreciated. They'll bring out the hammer and beat your tire rims back into shape and all you have to say is "thanks".

Great film company who have a summer program for kids as well.

Go Audio. If you're on the Go and need event mic's and boards, Mike's got it and you can get it.

 

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Chilliwack